WSPU postcard of Flora Drummond, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst arrested on 13 October 1908, on a charge of conduct likely to provoke a breach of the peace; from  LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/02/064…

The Home Front, WHN Conference image 2014. Image courtesy Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service…

Eleanor Rathbone campaigning (unsuccessfully) for election as an independent candidate for East Toxteth in Liverpool in 1922; from LSE Library’s collections COLL MISC 1104…

Women’s History is sent to WHN members in Spring, Summer and Autumn; digital copies are available for download.…

The Women’s Land Army in Britain during the Second World War; from the collections of The Imperial War Museum (IWM non commercial licence).…

1970s London from the series On a Good Day by Al Vandenberg; © Victoria and Albert Museum, London…

WSPU waitresses at a fund-raising event at The Women’s Exhibition in London May 1909; from LSE Library’s collections, TWL/2002/387

 

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Millicent Garrett Fawcett addressing  an estimated 50,000 women  at a mass suffrage rally in Hyde Park on 26 July 1913; from LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/01/177…

Fellowships for Independent Researchers

The Women’s History Network is offering a small grant of up to £750 to support the direct costs of those researching women’s history, who are not employed in higher education. The research should be intended to lead to a published outcome and costs that will be covered include, for example, travel and accommodation when visiting archives, photocopying or photographic licences required for work in archives.

The award made will not cover:

  • Conference attendance costs
  • Equipment costs
  • Publication costs
  • Subsistence costs (i.e. food and drink)
  • Administration costs

All applicants should complete the application form and submit it electronically with a one …

Fellowships for Early Career Researchers

The Women’s History Network is offering two WHN fellowships to support ECRs. Each fellowships is designed provide some financial support to those in that challenging time between completing their doctorate and their first academic post to continue working in women’s history. The fellowship will include

  • £1500 which can be used in any way that enables the Fellow to sustain their role as a researcher, for example on conference attendance, visits to archives, or to pay copyright fees for images for a publication or a public engagement activity.
  • £250 to organise an event or other activity to connect ECRs working in

WOMEN’S HISTORY NETWORK ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019

Professional Women:
the public, the private, and the political

2019 marks the centenary of the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act in Britain, which opened all ‘civil professions or vocations’, including the civil service and legal profession, to women. It was a significant landmark – but neither a beginning or an end – in the history of professional women.

This conference will explore not only the significance of the 1919 Act, but also the ‘professional woman’ in all periods, nations and forms. She is found far beyond ‘the professions’, in fields ranging from agriculture to industry, from education to the arts. She …

Clothing in 17th-Century Provincial England by Dr Danae Tankard

In our latest post, Dr Danae Tankard gives us a sneak preview of her forthcoming monograph, Clothing in 17th Century England, which will be released later this September.

My new book, Clothing in 17th-Century Provincial England (Bloomsbury Academic, 2019), examines the clothing culture of men and women living in Sussex.  It draws on an extensive and previously unexploited range of archival sources as well as a wide selection of contemporary literature.

In the book I use literary sources to identify and explore contemporary ideas about clothing, the individual and society, the relationship between London and the provinces, and …

Victoria Caste and Gosha hospital in shaping women’s healthcare in Colonial Madras by Arnab Chakraborty

In our latest fascinating post, Arnab Chakraborty details the intersections of gender, caste, and colonialism in nineteenth century Madras.

In late nineteenth century colonial India, it was extremely unlikely that upper caste Indian women were being treated at Western medical institutions. There were certain factors apart from caste, religious and class superstitions, and the purdah that kept the inner sanctum of colonial Indian households hidden from and untouched by the apparent glow of Western healthcare. Madras, one of the three presidencies in colonial India, had one of the most progressive and liberal healthcare systems in the colonial period, and it …

Call For Papers: Women of the Far Right (November 9 2019)

The University of Worcester’s annual Women’s History Conference seeks papers for this year’s event under the heading of: ‘Women of the Far Right’.  Send an abstract of 300 words to Dr Wendy Toon w.toon@worc.ac.uk by 31 August 2019. 

During the twentieth century the image of the far right has largely been dominated by men, and linked inseparably with personality traits which tended to fall under the stereotype of masculinity. Traits such as bravado, confidence and aggressiveness were writ large by Hitler, Stalin and Mussolini. However, to reduce the far right movement to this handful of men grossly underestimates the durability