WSPU postcard of Flora Drummond, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst arrested on 13 October 1908, on a charge of conduct likely to provoke a breach of the peace; from  LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/02/064…

The Home Front, WHN Conference image 2014. Image courtesy Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service…

Eleanor Rathbone campaigning (unsuccessfully) for election as an independent candidate for East Toxteth in Liverpool in 1922; from LSE Library’s collections COLL MISC 1104…

Women’s History is sent to WHN members in Spring, Summer and Autumn; digital copies are available for download.…

The Women’s Land Army in Britain during the Second World War; from the collections of The Imperial War Museum (IWM non commercial licence).…

1970s London from the series On a Good Day by Al Vandenberg; © Victoria and Albert Museum, London…

WSPU waitresses at a fund-raising event at The Women’s Exhibition in London May 1909; from LSE Library’s collections, TWL/2002/387

 

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Millicent Garrett Fawcett addressing  an estimated 50,000 women  at a mass suffrage rally in Hyde Park on 26 July 1913; from LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/01/177…

Women’s History Network Annual Conference 2020

Save the Date: 3-4 September 2020

Homes, Food and Farms

Venue – Denman College, New Rd, Marcham, Abingdon OX13 6NW.

How Women Build Call for papers

How Women Build

A two-day conference, Wikithon Event and Exhibition at the Manchester School of Architecture – 26-27thJune 2020

Supported by the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art and the Women’s History Network

Keynote Speakers:  Dr Elizabeth Darling (editor of ‘Suffragette City’ (together with Nathaniel Robert Walker, Routledge, 2019)and Dr Sonja Dümpelmann (editor of ‘Women, Modernity and Landscape Architecture’ (together with John Beardsley; Routledge, 2015)and author of the biography of Maria Theresa Parpagliolo Shephard (Weimar: WDG, 2004)

Call for papers

This two-day conference at the Manchester School of Architecture will …

Education and Empire: What’s Florence Nightingale got to do with it? By Dr. Rebecca Swartz

What did Florence Nightingale have to do with colonial education? That was a question I had to ask myself when I came across her 1863 survey of education and health of Indigenous children in colonial schools in the British Empire.  Nightingale’s study, which included statistics from one hundred and forty-three schools in South Africa, Australia, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), Canada and Sierra Leone, concluded that education did not lead to any negative health outcomes for Indigenous children, but it must be adapted to local circumstances to achieve the best results.

Nightingale’s conclusion about education being adapted to the needs of …

CFP: The ‘Madwoman’ and the Institution: Interrogating the Experience of Female Insanity in the Long Nineteenth Century – 1 April 2020

This conference aims to reconfigure our understanding of the ‘madwoman’ in England’s long nineteenth century, asking key questions about the diagnosis, treatment, care and representation of women perceived as ‘insane’.

This period saw the institutionalization of large swathes of the population, including those considered mentally ill. Simultaneously, medical advancements and increased interest in mental illness saw a specific focus on conditions often typified as ‘female’, with disorders attributed to their reproductive organs and bodies. Places of treatment and care – such as public asylums, private madhouses, workhouses or prisons – were typically patriarchal institutions, run by males, with women diagnosed …

Wives, Widows and Carers

Call for Papers

Wives, Widows and Carers

Saturday 28 March

at St Giles Hospice, Fisherwick Rd, Whittington, Lichfield WS14 9LH

This conference is organised by The Women’s History Network: Midlands Region

Women in all societies across all historical periods have been defined by their roles as wives, widows or carers.  Such roles, although ubiquitous, are not always well recorded or discussed in mainstream history.  This conference therefore seeks to both recover the histories of such women and to think critically about what these roles mean for women.

Are such roles a source of power, pain or pleasure?

How have individual …

Dictionary of British Women Artists by Dr Sara Gray

For ‘throwback Thursday’, Dr. Sara Gray gives us a glimpse into her 2009 book, Dictionary of British Women Artists.

The history of women artists remains largely uncharted even today, but particularly the history of British women artists. When I started researching for a Ph.D. thesis in the 1990s, it was virtually impossible to find anything much about women in British art or the decorative arts, other than the occasional reference here and there in a history book. Not coincidentally, most of the art history books I checked were written by men!

When I began to research old journals and newspapers …