WSPU postcard of Flora Drummond, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst arrested on 13 October 1908, on a charge of conduct likely to provoke a breach of the peace; from  LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/02/064…

The Home Front, WHN Conference image 2014. Image courtesy Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service…

Eleanor Rathbone campaigning (unsuccessfully) for election as an independent candidate for East Toxteth in Liverpool in 1922; from LSE Library’s collections COLL MISC 1104…

Women’s History is sent to WHN members in Spring, Summer and Autumn; digital copies are available for download.…

The Women’s Land Army in Britain during the Second World War; from the collections of The Imperial War Museum (IWM non commercial licence).…

1970s London from the series On a Good Day by Al Vandenberg; © Victoria and Albert Museum, London…

WSPU waitresses at a fund-raising event at The Women’s Exhibition in London May 1909; from LSE Library’s collections, TWL/2002/387

 

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Millicent Garrett Fawcett addressing  an estimated 50,000 women  at a mass suffrage rally in Hyde Park on 26 July 1913; from LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/01/177…

WOMEN’S HISTORY NETWORK ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019

Professional Women:
the public, the private, and the political

2019 marks the centenary of the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act in Britain, which opened all ‘civil professions or vocations’, including the civil service and legal profession, to women. It was a significant landmark – but neither a beginning or an end – in the history of professional women.

This conference will explore not only the significance of the 1919 Act, but also the ‘professional woman’ in all periods, nations and forms. She is found far beyond ‘the professions’, in fields ranging from agriculture to industry, from education to the arts. She …

CALL FOR PAPERS: Negotiating empire: women, economic practice and colonialism

The thirtieth annual workshop of the Economic History Society Women’s Committee, organised by Dr Misha Ewen and Dr Hannah Young, will take place at the University of Manchester on Saturday, 23rd November 2019.

The 2019 workshop will explore women’s involvement in and negotiation of the economic practices that built, sustained and resisted empires across the globe from the seventeenth to the nineteenth centuries. It aims to examine the experiences of a wide range of women, colonisers and colonised, free and enslaved, interrogating the multiple axes of power that shaped the way these women thought and behaved. In doing so, it …

Victorian Penal Institutions for Juvenile Females and Mary Carpenter, by Tahaney Alghrani

In our latest post Tahaney Alghrani reflects on crime, gender and ‘reform’ in Victorian port cities.

In recent months, youth knife crime has been much debated in the British press. These debates, however, are not new.  Just as today there are conflicting views on how we should address youth crime, this was also a central debate in the nineteenth century. Reformatory and Industrial schools, the first penal institutions for juvenile offenders, were established in 1855 to remove youths from their criminal associations and ‘at risk’ environments in order to reform them and train them within industry. Recent research by Barry …

Call for papers: Gender Religion and Power Conference

Interdisciplinary conference
The Bedford Centre for the History of Women and Gender

Gender, Religion and Power

Saturday 21 September at Senate House, London

We invite academics at all levels to propose a paper to this one-day conference, and we especially encourage postgraduate researchers to submit abstracts. This is to be a multidisciplinary conference which analyses the historical links between gender and religion, gender and power, or all three. We welcome submissions from all historical periods and all geographical regions, and encourage those interested to tailor their submissions to their own research.

Suggested topics include, but are not limited …

Ruth Cavendish-Bentinck by Dr. Gillian Murphy

In this latest post, Dr. Gillian Murphy (re) introduces us to Ruth Cavendish-Bentick, suffragette and socialist.

Ruth Cavendish-Bentinck was the illegitimate daughter of Ferdinand St Maur, the elder son of the 12th Duke of Somerset, and a half-gipsy maid. Her parents died when Ruth was young and she was brought up by her grandparents, the Duke and Duchess of Somerset.

Her grandfather was an advocate of married women’s property rights. Her great-aunt was Caroline Norton, who had launched and won the campaign to give women undisputed right of access to their children when they were estranged from their husbands. …

CfP: WOMEN’S HISTORY SCOTLAND, GENDER TRANSGRESSIONS

WOMEN’S HISTORY SCOTLAND CONFERENCE

Edinburgh, 16th November 2019

GENDER TRANSGRESSIONS

Historical perspectives

Call for Papers

This conference will explore the idea of transgressing gender norms (including those relating to masculinity and femininity) and the consequences of this for individuals or groups. We welcome proposals relating to all historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary) and all geographical places including Scotland.

We understand ‘gender transgression’ to refer to sets of ideas and practices that encompass (but are not restricted to) the following areas:

  • Legal, moral, ethical and religious frameworks
  • Wrongdoing, reformation and reconciliation
  • Borders and boundary crossing
  • Resistance and rebellion
  • Medicine,