WSPU postcard of Flora Drummond, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst arrested on 13 October 1908, on a charge of conduct likely to provoke a breach of the peace; from  LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/02/064…

The Home Front, WHN Conference image 2014. Image courtesy Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service…

Eleanor Rathbone campaigning (unsuccessfully) for election as an independent candidate for East Toxteth in Liverpool in 1922; from LSE Library’s collections COLL MISC 1104…

Women’s History is sent to WHN members in Spring, Summer and Autumn; digital copies are available for download.…

The Women’s Land Army in Britain during the Second World War; from the collections of The Imperial War Museum (IWM non commercial licence).…

1970s London from the series On a Good Day by Al Vandenberg; © Victoria and Albert Museum, London…

WSPU waitresses at a fund-raising event at The Women’s Exhibition in London May 1909; from LSE Library’s collections, TWL/2002/387

 

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Millicent Garrett Fawcett addressing  an estimated 50,000 women  at a mass suffrage rally in Hyde Park on 26 July 1913; from LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/01/177…

WOMEN’S HISTORY NETWORK ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019

Professional Women:

the public, the private, and the political

 CONFERENCE ANNOUNCEMENT AND CALL FOR PAPERS

2019 marks the centenary of the Sex Disqualification (Removal) Act in Britain, which opened all ‘civil professions or vocations’, including the civil service and legal profession, to women. It was a significant landmark – but neither a beginning or an end – in the history of professional women.

This conference will explore not only the significance of the 1919 Act, but also the ‘professional woman’ in all periods, nations and forms. She is found far beyond ‘the professions’, in fields ranging from agriculture to industry, …

2018 WHN Schools Black History Month Competition

The Women’s History Network is launching a competition to encourage young people to get actively involved in celebrating black history. Black History Month is celebrated in October, but the Women’s History Network want to focus specifically on the history of black women. We want to challenge young researchers to get inspired by the diverse and rich histories of black women in Britain and to create a piece of art that reflects the history of either a group or an individual.

London based artist and ceramicist Freya Bramble-Carter – of the BBC’s Great Pottery Throw Down – will interpret the winning …

Homes fit for Heroines ?

Homes fit for Heroines ? 

A conference organized by the Women’s History Network: Midlands Region, University of Worcester, Avoncroft Museum and the Voices of War and Peace WWI Engagement Centre.

On Saturday 16 March, 2019 at Avoncroft Museum of Historic Buildings,  Stoke Heath, Bromsgrove, Midlands B60 4JR.

In 1918, the day after the armistice the Prime Minister Lloyd George promised ‘homes fit for heroes’ would be built for the returning soldiers. But behind this slogan lie many controversies: who would provide these homes, who would decide what a ‘fit’ home was and would they be suitable working environments for women …

The Enigma of Ellen Terry (1847-1928) – Dr. Veronica Isaac

Ellen Terry (1847-1928)

‘Of Ellen Terry, the actress, Our Lady of the Lyceum as Oscar Wilde used to style her, what a series of wonderful pictures live in the memory”[i]

ELLEN TERRY, photograph by Samuel Alexander Walker (1841-1922), a photographer with a studio on Regent Street, London. The photograph shows Ellen Terry when living with Edward Godwin.

A leading late nineteenth century actress, Dame Ellen Terry’s lifestyle directly challenged conventional Victorian morality and social codes: encompassing three marriages, two illegitimate children, and at least two long term love affairs. Despite this, she became one of the most respected performers …

CfP: White Slavery in Transnational and International Context, 1880-1950

Date: 21 June 2019

Location: University of Warwick (UK)

Keynote: Brian Donovan ((University of Kansas)

This is a call for abstracts for paper, poster and creative presentations for a one day interdisciplinary conference on white slavery, as trafficking in women was historically called. The conference seeks to question how white slavery manifested in transnational and international contexts but welcomes papers on any localities.

We welcome papers exploring different aspects of white slavery from nationalism to visual representations, and their impact on anti-white slavery legislation. The conference seeks to investigate white slavery and its legacies from conceptual, legal, popular culture perspectives. …

Why we should remember the housewives of the First World War, by Professor Karen Hunt

As our high streets become covered in poppies, we should ask ourselves who we are being asked to commemorate. Despite four years of television programmes, exhibitions, art installations and local history projects, we still seem to find it easier to focus on the trenches rather than the home front; on men rather than women; and among the women, on munition workers and VADs rather than housewives. The stories we tell have hardly changed despite the large amount of money put into commemoration through the Heritage Lottery Fund, large scale projects like the BBC’s WW1 at Home and the various …

War Widows and the controversy over Remembrance Sunday services at the Cenotaph (1972-1982), by Dr Janis Lomas

Remembrance Sunday has a particular significance this year as it marks the centenary of the First World War armistice, yet few remember the First and Second World War widows who following the foundation of the War Widows’ Association (WWA) in 1971 campaigned to be allowed to take part in remembrance activities held at the Cenotaph in London. War widows’ pension was introduced in 1914, but this campaigning organisation gave widows a voice.

Widows found their exclusion from the Cenotaph Service of Remembrance particularly hurtful.  This exclusion had come about, as Adrian Gregory points out, when the Armistice Day commemorations …