Blog

Victorian Penal Institutions for Juvenile Females and Mary Carpenter, by Tahaney Alghrani

In our latest post Tahaney Alghrani reflects on crime, gender and ‘reform’ in Victorian port cities.

In recent months, youth knife crime has been much debated in the British press. These debates, however, are not new.  Just as today there are conflicting views on how we should address youth crime, this was also a central debate in the nineteenth century. Reformatory and Industrial schools, the first penal institutions for juvenile offenders, were established in 1855 to remove youths from their criminal associations and ‘at risk’ environments in order to reform them and train them within industry. Recent research by Barry …

CfP: WOMEN’S HISTORY SCOTLAND, GENDER TRANSGRESSIONS

WOMEN’S HISTORY SCOTLAND CONFERENCE

Edinburgh, 16th November 2019

GENDER TRANSGRESSIONS

Historical perspectives

Call for Papers

This conference will explore the idea of transgressing gender norms (including those relating to masculinity and femininity) and the consequences of this for individuals or groups. We welcome proposals relating to all historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern, contemporary) and all geographical places including Scotland.

We understand ‘gender transgression’ to refer to sets of ideas and practices that encompass (but are not restricted to) the following areas:

  • Legal, moral, ethical and religious frameworks
  • Wrongdoing, reformation and reconciliation
  • Borders and boundary crossing
  • Resistance and rebellion
  • Medicine,

CfP: Architectures of Power: buildings of politics and governance, 1750-2000.

Call for papers, Girton College, University of Cambridge, 26-28 June 2020

IMG 1031 crHistorians have long recognised the importance of architecture within the exercising of political power. Yet the interaction between power and place, between human actor and physical location, is a difficult one to quantify. This conference brings together political, social, cultural, and architectural historians to explore this relationship. Architecture could be mobilised to exhibit and to legitimise political power, but it could also have a profound influence on decision-makers at crucial moments of governance. Architecture has played a fundamental role in performances of statecraft. Accounting for this architectural agency, without

EVENT: Escaping the Doll’s House: Women, the Arts, War and Work 1910-1920

Escaping the Doll’s House: Women, the Arts, War and Work 1910-1920. May 17 @ 10:30 am3:30 pm

To mark the launch of a new exhibition at the Women’s Library, London

‘The Sacred Year 1919: women and the professions’ and the new production, at London’s Finborough Theatre, of St John Ervine’s 1913 play Jane Clegg, a one-day event of talks and discussion on these and related topics is taking place at the Women’s Library.

Speakers include

  • Maggie

Gender, Family, and Politics: The Howard Women, 1485-1558 – Dr. Nicola Clark

In this fascinating post Dr. Clark tells us about her important new monograph: Gender, Family, and Politics: The Howard Women, 1485-1558 (OUP, 2018).

The Howard family, Dukes of Norfolk, were the family most entwined with the Tudor dynasty during the sixteenth century. The men were earl marshals, lord admirals, lord treasurers, privy councillors, the king’s jousting buddies; the women, queen consorts of England (Anne Boleyn and Katherine Howard), ladies-in-waiting, the godmothers of royal children. Generally, people talk about families like the Howards exactly as I have just done – as collectives. In many ways this is logical. Political dynasties …