Events

The Fruitful Body: Gender and Image

Annual Workshop of the Women’s Studies Group, 1558–1837
The Fruitful Body: Gender and Image

The Foundling Museum, London, 6 May 2017

The Women’s Studies Group, 1558–1837 annual workshop takes place every spring at The Foundling Museum in London. A distinguished invited speaker provides the keynote in the morning, followed by discussion and lunch; in the afternoon, participants each give a 5-minute presentation on a subject relevant to the theme of the keynote, followed by discussion. Previous speakers have included Jacqueline Labbe of the University of Sheffield and Laura Gowing of King’s College London. This year’s speaker is Karen Hearn of …

Women’s History Seminar: January – March 2017

Women’s History Seminar, Institute of Historical Research, University of London, Senate House, Malet Street

IHR at 17.15 in Room N301 (Pollard Room) 

All are welcome

Friday, 20 January 2017: Charmian Mansell (Exeter)  Domestic service?  The experiences of female servants in early modern communities

    Service was a typical and defining experience for young women in early modern England.  Ann Kussmaul estimates that around 60 per cent of 15- to 24-year-olds were employed as servants, working in rural and urban, rich and poor households across the country in exchange for wages and bed and board.  Female service is typically studied in a …

Workshop: Women’s Work: Women’s Employment in the First World War and Interwar Years

Friday 27 January 2017, 10.00-16.00 – Sheffield

This workshop explores the experiences, working practices, myth and realities for middle-class and professional women during the war years and the decades that followed. It will examine these women at work on the land, as nurses, in the Civil Service, at the BBC, in trade unions, as secretaries, as office clerks and as portrayed in fiction, considering career opportunities as well as challenges and restrictions. In exploring women’s employment, it will examine how occupational identities, training and working practices were shaped by class and gender.  The full programme is available using the booking …

Women Explorers: Crossing Cultures

Join us for a day of free events at Liverpool’s World Museum on Sunday November 20, 10.30 – 4.45.

When the explorer Mary Kingsley first sights the coast of West Africa in 1893, she admits she is terrified. Fear can often steer our encounters with those different from ourselves, but Kingsley and other British women explorers turned that fear to hope. They opened our eyes to other cultures and expanded our understanding of what it means to be human. Did their gender help them to see the world differently?

This is just one of many questions we ask as we …

Women Writers as Art Critics in the Long Eighteenth Century

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