WSPU postcard of Flora Drummond, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst arrested on 13 October 1908, on a charge of conduct likely to provoke a breach of the peace; from  LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/02/064…

The Home Front, WHN Conference image 2014. Image courtesy Worcestershire Archive and Archaeology Service…

Eleanor Rathbone campaigning (unsuccessfully) for election as an independent candidate for East Toxteth in Liverpool in 1922; from LSE Library’s collections COLL MISC 1104…

Women’s History is sent to WHN members in Spring, Summer and Autumn; digital copies are available for download.…

The Women’s Land Army in Britain during the Second World War; from the collections of The Imperial War Museum (IWM non commercial licence).…

1970s London from the series On a Good Day by Al Vandenberg; © Victoria and Albert Museum, London…

WSPU waitresses at a fund-raising event at The Women’s Exhibition in London May 1909; from LSE Library’s collections, TWL/2002/387

 

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Millicent Garrett Fawcett addressing  an estimated 50,000 women  at a mass suffrage rally in Hyde Park on 26 July 1913; from LSE Library’s collections, 7JCC/O/01/177…

CFP: Gender in Modern Welsh History Symposium

CALL FOR PAPERS

Date: 11 September 2019
Location: Cardiff University

This one-day symposium aims to bring together early career researchers and established scholars who work on any aspect of the history of gender in nineteenth and twentieth-century Wales. It will seek to interrogate gender as a concept which encompasses both femininity and masculinity, to provide fresh perspectives on familiar themes, and to encourage delegates to consider how gender can transform broader narratives in histories of Wales. Significant advances have been made in the field of Welsh women’s history since Deirdre Beddoe’s eminently quotable claim in 1981 that if ‘a creature …

Representing Women – Dr Freya Gowrley

In this wonderful piece Dr. Freya Gowrley reflects on representation, fatness and body-shaming.

When asked what Women’s History Month meant to me as the prompt for writing this blog post, my mind immediately went to issues of representation. For me, the month highlights the excellent work being done to make history more inclusive by finding and reintroducing women into the historical canon, whilst unpacking the systems of oppression that have kept women from it. By identifying their previously overlooked contributions, the gendered issues affecting them, and the forms of their representation, or lack thereof, throughout history, this work is vital …

Labour Women in Power: Cabinet Ministers in the 20th century – Dr. Paula Bartley.

(L-R Margaret Bondfield, Ellen Wilkinson, Barbara Castle, Judith Hart and Shirley Williams)

In this post, Dr. Paula Bartley gives us a sneak peak of her fabulous new book: Labour Women in Power: Cabinet Ministers in the 20th century (Palgrave Macmillan, 2019)

In 1997 Tony Blair appointed the same number of women to Cabinet positions as there had been in the rest of the century. Between 1918 and 1997, only five Labour women held this high office of state: Margaret Bondfield, Ellen Wilkinson, Barbara Castle, Judith Hart and Shirley Williams.

The five who did manage to get to these …

What Women’s History Month Means to Me, Dr. Ana Stevenson

In this powerful blog, Dr. Ana Stevenson reflects on the enduring importance of  ‘hidden histories’ and ‘inspirational’ women.

In 1972, Ms. Magazine began a “Lost Women” series, dedicated to sharing the histories of women from around the world. Over the next decade, it featured women such as Mary Wollstonecraft, Frances Wright, Harriet Tubman, Annie Oakley, and Charlotte Perkins Gillman. While these names are fairly familiar today, many remained little known prior to the efforts of women’s liberation. In the years before women’s history had made much headway, in either the academy or society, historian Judith Bennet attests to the transformative

Celebrating ‘women’s history bookshelves’ by Dr. Jo Stanley

In this post, Dr. Jo Stanley reflects on the growing visibility of women’s history in bookshops around the globe.

This post celebrates the moment when I realised there was going to be a genre of books called ‘women’s history’ – and that it was going to be incisive, fascinating, written with gravitas and offer me/us all sorts of unexpended gendered insights. The date must have been autumn 1978. I’d gone into Sisterwite, London’s new first women’s bookshop, to see if there was anything about the history of women’s work and industrial relations.

This was my maiden visit, although I’d been …