WHN Book Prize

WHN Book Prize 2019

The Women’s History Network (UK) Book Prize, is an annual £500 prize for a first single-authored monograph, which focusses on women’s or gender history.

Entries close on 31 March 2019 (for books published during 2018).

Criteria for eligibility are as follows: 

  • The book must make a significant contribution to women’s history or gender history.
  • The book must be written in English and have and accessible style.
  • The book must have been published in the UK between January 1st and 31st December 2018.
  • The candidate should be a member of the Women’s History Network (UK).
  • The candidate should have been resident in the UK, or affiliated to a UK Institution, for the previous three years.
  • The winner should be able to attend the WHN Annual Conference to receive their award. (The WHN will cover the cost of UK rail travel to the Conference venue at the LSE.)
  • Winners will be expected to write a short summary of the book of between 500 and 1000 words suitable for the WHN blog prior to the WHN conference.
  • Current members of the WHN Steering Committee are not eligible to enter the competition.

For further information please contact: bookprize@womenshistorynetwork.org


Winners


WHN Book Prize Winner 2019

This year’s winner was Imaobong Umoren’s, Race Women Internationalists published by the University of California Press.

The panel thought Race Women Internationalists praised this  book about the history of race, global freedom struggles and transnational history looked at through the perspective of gender. They considered it was original in concept and that the research was breath-taking, ranging widely across geographical space.…


WHN Book Prize Winner 2018

This year’s winner was Briony McDonagh’s Elite Women and the Agricultural Landscape 1700-1830 published by Routledge in 2017This book provides an explicitly feminist historical geography of the eighteenth-century English rural landscape. The panel considered that the book an original, path-breaking book which makes a significant contribution to women’s history.  It is engaging and accessible to read without losing academic rigour, based upon fluent and coherent analysis a range of a range of archival and secondary sources.

 …


Winner of Book Prize 2017

Women, Credit and Debt in Early Modern ScotlandThe winner was: Women, Credit and Debt in Early Modern Scotland, by Cathryn Spence, published by Manchester University Press. This book provides the first full-length consideration of women’s economic roles in early modern Scottish towns. The panel considered that the book provided a meticulously researched and convincing argument of women’s involvement in economic activity in early modern Scotland.

http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9781784992538/


Winner of the Book Prize 2016

Our Fighting SistersThe panel decided to award the prize for 2016 to Natalya Vince, Our Fighting Sisters: Nation, Memory and Gender in Algeria, 1954– 2012 published by Manchester University Press. Between 1954 and 1962, Algerian women played a major role in the struggle to end French rule in one of the twentieth century’s most violent wars of decolonisation. This fascinating book provides the first in-depth exploration of what happened to these women after independence in 1962, offering an important insight into an area of women’s history which has until now remained hidden.

http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9780719091070/

The panel also specially commended Laura King’s Family Men.


Winner of Book Prize 2015

Women and the Counter-ReformationThe 2015 winner was Simone Laqua-O’Donnell’s book Women and the Counter Reformation in Early Modern Munster published by Oxford University Press.  This was considered to be a tightly organised book, based on a nuanced reading of many sources, and written in an engaging style that draws in the reader, even those without knowledge of the period.  The panel found it enthralling and difficult to put down.  It has a lovely opening page which links to the portrait on the front of the book and has some truly original insights.

For further details see Reviews in History  https://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/1688

See all book prize winners

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