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Arcangela Tarabotti, Elena Cassandra: A Feminist Venetian Republic Nun

This entry has been slightly edited. WHN Admin.

Silvia Speranza Geltrude Palandri

 

Silvia Speranza Geltrude Palandri

Arcangela Tarabotti, Elena Cassandra, was a nun in the Venetian Republic. At that time, Venice was a cultural centre around which gravitated prestigious figures from other parts of Italy and of Europe. However, the atmosphere was still deeply misogynist.

The lash of secular feeling of the Enlightenment endured throughout the seventeenth century. Appeals were still made to the Holy Scriptures and to the Gospels through which women were denied an active role in society beyond that of devoted wife and caring mother. These

NORTH AMERICAN WOMEN AND WORLD WAR ONE

‘Yeomen (F)’, Group photograph, with a large U.S. flag, taken at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 30 October 1918. Some of them are wearing USS Southery hat bands. Other hat bands read U.S. Navy and U.S. Naval Reserve. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph, NH 53175.

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

North American Women and World War One

 

Saturday, 4 November 2017

University of Worcester, Henwick Grove, Worcester, WR2 6AJ

 

The University of Worcester’s annual Women’s History Conference seeks papers for this year’s event under the heading of: ‘North American Women and World War One’

The United States entered

The Mystery of Isabella and the String of Beads: A Woman Doctor in WW1

The following is an excerpt from Katrina Kirkwood’s book, The Mystery of Isabella and the String of Beads: A woman Doctor in WW1. Information about Katrina Kirkwood and her book was published on the blog on 13 march 2017.  The book is sold on Amazon and good book stores. WHN Admin.

Katrina Kirkwood

The Mystery of Isabella and the String of Beads: A Woman Doctor in WW1

Prologue

 

 

“There might be German blood on these,” I warned as I placed the box on the table. From its battered cardboard top poked a rectangular, twill-covered object and a length of

VOICES OF WOMEN IN THE GREAT WAR AND ITS AFTERMATH

CALL FOR CONFERENCE PAPERS

Voices of Women in the Great War and its Aftermath

 

Taking place at The Black Country Living Museum, 2 Tipton Rd, Dudley DY1 4SQ on 13-14 April 2018

 

Although the Great War is often seen as a time of change, offering new opportunities for women and culminating in 1918 in the extension of the franchise to many, the conflict was not experienced in the same way by all.  Class, region, age and marital status all shaped women’s lives during the war and after.

Working opportunities on the land, in munitions, clerical work, transport services …

FOUR PIONEERING WOMEN OF AUSTRALIA: JANET LOARING

Janet, 1895
Photo supplied by Denis Blight

Denis Blight

 

In 1901 a young parlour maid, Janet Loaring, stepped on Board the S.S. Perthshire to travel to Australia from Dorset in the United Kingdom with 43 other young, single women, escorted by a matron. In the Upstairs/Downstairs society of Victorian England, like her fellow travellers, she was definitely from the lower floors: her father a domestic gardener who died in six months earlier in 1900, her mother a dressmaker. Her eldest brother had emigrated in 1886, which was some comfort as she waved goodbye to her mother.

Janet’s diary of …